Definition

Bromine is a chemical element that is one of 118 elements that appear on the periodic table. Bromine’s appearance in liquid form (in an ambient temperature) is a deep-red, oily liquid. As bromine evaporates from an ambient state into a gas, a similar-coloured gas is produced.

What is Bromine?
Container containing bromine

Element 35 (Bromine) is well known for its sharp, chemical smell.

What is Bromine used for?

Bromine is used in various sectors including agricultural, manufacturing and medical spaces. Listed below are some of the most common examples of where bromine can found are:

  • Seawater
  • Pesticides
  • Plastics
  • Dyes
  • Flame retardants (fire safety equipment used to suppress fires)

Further examples of bromines usage can also been seen across various different sectors including the following.

Ideal Response logo

Swimming Pools / Water Treatments

Used as an alternative to chlorine, bromine is an alternative substance used for various disinfectants to prevent algae and microorganisms in swimming pools.

Pharmaceuticals

Various over-the-counter prescription drugs contain bromine to treat a multitude of health issues. Bromide ions have the ability to decrease the sensitivity of the central nervous system which makes them effective for use as sedatives, anti-epileptics, and tranquilisers.

Photography

The most well-known use of bromine is in making photographic films. Silver bromide is light-sensitive and is used to manufacture photography plates. Its microscopic particles when exposed to light, undergo a change as a result of chemical reaction.

Bromine on the Periodic Table

Bromine, abbreviated on the periodic table as Br, has an atomic number of 35. The element has many other properties including:

Bromine Properties
Atomic number35
Atomic mass79.904 g.mol -1
Density3.1 g.cm-3 at 20°C
Melting point– 7.2 °C
Boiling point58.8 °C
Vanderwaals radius0.165 nm
Ionic radius0.195 nm (-1)
Isotopes10
Electronic shell[ Ar ] 3d10 4s2 4p5
Energy of first ionisation1142.7 kJ.mol -1
Standard potential1.08 V

5 Facts about Bromine

Besides its chemical properties seen on the periodic table above, bromine poses some interesting facts including:

  • Bromine was discovered in 1826 by German scientists Antoine Jérôme Balard and Carl Jacob Löwig
  • Bromine is toxic to humans
  • Bromine is the Earth’s 44th most common element
  • The name bromine derives from Greek term for “stench”
  • Historically bromine was used as a sedative

Bromine Poisoning

Bromine vapours are harmful in both a liquid state and vapor state; especially if the element has been inhaled or exposed to the skin. The element irritates the skin and tissues that it comes into direct contact with.

You can assess whether bromine poisoning depending on how much bromine the individual has been exposed to and the duration of time they have been exposed for. Certain factors should also be considered for the individual who has been exposed including any existing medical health issues alongside considering their age.

Ideal Response logo

If you come into contact with bromine, avoid making any touch contact with the substance. Remove any items of clothing contaminated and place these into a double wrapped plastic bag. Avoid touching your clothes with your hands, instead use tongs or similar objects to place the clothes in the plastic bag. Dispose of any other objects that have come into contact with the element.

According to Waste Management guidelines, bromine is categorised as a hazardous substance and should always be disposed off by an accredited hazard waste carrier. Ideal Response have undertaken both small and large bromine cleaning situations from all over. Contact a specialist bromine clean-up service for a fast and effective response and dispose of the chemical safely.

FREE Estimate

  • Drop files here or
    Accepted file types: jpg, png, pdf, jpeg, gif, heic.
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.